A child suffering from Measles visited public places while contagious

A child suffering from Measles visited public places while contagious

A child suffering from measles visited public places and Randall Children’s hospital while contagious. According to health officials, the unvaccinated child contracted measles earlier this month after traveling overseas. A child returned through the Portland international airport after traveling to a different country with measles. He visited public areas like PDX and Randall children hospital during his measles outbreak. The child was at Portland international airport on Thursday, 14 Nov. Then, the child visited peace health Southwest Medical center Vancouver on the same day. The child then visited Randall children hospital on 17 Nov. Clark County Public health confirmed that cases of measles mainly occur in the age between 1 to 10 years.

Measles shows symptoms like high fever, cough, and red eyes. Moreover, the body shows red rashes and patches. Some children also show a symptom of the runny nose during measles. If any child is showing similar symptoms, their parents should immediately contact the nearest health centers. It is essential to limit the public contact of a child suffering from measles. According to the CDC, one dose of MMR vaccine would be 93% effective. However, two doses of MMR would be 97% effective. Typically, children receive the first dose of MMR from 12 to 15 months after birth. They receive the second dose of MMR from four to six years of age.

Clark County Public Health director Dr. Alan Melnick said, “Immunization is the best way to protect yourself and the community from measles.” Seventy-one people in South County faced a measles outbreak earlier this year. Public Health Advisors are cautioning people to contact health centers if they see similar symptoms. Those who take public transport or work in crowded areas should check their health status right away. Moreover, advisors are suggesting calling the doctor before visiting the hospital to avoid contact with other people. Health officials are arranging just-in-time medicine called immunoglobulin to reduce the risk of developing measles in high-risk individuals.

Related posts

Leave a Comment