FTC Claims Match.com For Fake Ads and Illegal Marketing Practices

ftc claims match.com for fake ads and illegal marketing practices

On Wednesday, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission has taken legal action against Match Group. It is a colossal online dating company that owns PlentyOfFish, OkCupid, Tinder, and Match.com. The company has claims for reportedly appealing people to pay for its Match.com service using unreal love interest ads. Even more, the company has other claims of allegedly fraudulent marketing practices. As per the complaint, hundreds of thousands of users have subscribed to Match.com quickly after getting a bogus communication.

The US regulator has sued the company for attempting to attract likely subscribers with emails from fake candidates revealing interest in pairing up. Apart from this the email, without user pictures, notified receivers that a specific profile had shown interest in them. After that, they offered a link to know more which directed them to a subscription page. According to the FTC, some users had bought subscriptions to see the details of the users. Andrew Smith, the director of the FTC’s Bureau of Consumer Protection, said Match.com had fooled people into paying for subscriptions through messages. The executive surmises while the company had knowledge of those scammers.

Whereas, the arrival of news, revealing the FTC complaint, has resulted in nearly as much 8% fall in the company’s share. Match, one of the dominant providers of online dating service, controls around 25% of the online dating market. The company notes the FTC has represented its data wrongly. As per Match Group, the federal agency has neglected internal emails and depends on selected data to make excessive claims. Even more, the online dating giant aims to defend itself, against the charges, in court. Match.com enables users to create a free profile on the platform, but one cannot reply to messages without having a paid subscription. FTC’s reports reveal between June 2016 and May 2018; customers had bought more than 4,99,000 subscriptions within a day of getting a fake ad.

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